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Tools for Cultivating a Healthy Gut!
Meat Stock and Bone Broth

Monica Corrado, Simply Being Well
Friday, September 7, 2018

Meat Stock HEALS and SEALS a leaky gut
Bone Broth is used AFTER the gut is healed and sealed!

Meat Stock vs. Bone Broth: Telling them Apart

Meat Stock is the stock that is gained from cooking a piece or pieces of meat that have a joint in them, for a relatively short amount of time. Some examples are turkey legs or thighs, a whole chicken cut up, a beef or lamb shank. Meat stock is cooked for a short amount of time: 1.5-3 hours for poultry and no more than 6-8 hours for beef, bison or lamb. Making meat stock is making a meal: you will eat the meat, the cartilage or tendons and the vegetables and drink the stock.

Meat Stock is especially rich in gelatin and amino acids like proline and glycine. These amino acids help to heal and strengthen connective tissue. Meat Stock is absolutely fundamental to healing the gut lining, aka, the lining of the small intestine, specifically, the
duodenum. In Gut and Psychology Syndrome™, Dr. Campbell-McBride explains how to prepare meat stock to be used during the early stages of the GAPS Diet to heal the gut lining.

Bone Broth is made from cooking bones (with a little bit of meat for flavor, color, and amino acids) for a long period of time. The purpose of making Bone Broth is to prepare a large quantity of broth at one time. Bone Broth made well is the foundation of nutrient-dense soups, stews, gravies, and when used to cook grains, will neutralize their anti-nutrients!

Bone Broth made well is a nutrient-dense elixir that gives a great bang for your nutritional buck: it is high in minerals your body needs that are easily absorbed, it can reduce the amount of protein you eat, it helps you digest your food and the gelatin has been known to help heal many digestive and other disorders, including anemia, diabetes, colitis, rheumatoid arthritis and even cancer1. Gelatinous Bone Broth is liquid nutrition for lactating mothers, women going through menopause, athletes and children whose bones are growing.

Important: The amino acid profile of the meat stock and bone broth are very different. For some with leaky guts or leaky membranes in the brain, the high concentration of glutamic acid in Bone Broth may be problematic, causing nervous system dysfunction in those prone to seizures, ADD, Autism Spectrum Disorders and MS. Bone Broth, a broth that is made from a majority of bones, and cooked for a long period of time as noted above, will be high in glutamic acid, and naturally occurring MSG (free glutamates). For this reason, Bone Broth can trigger nervous system disorders in those who have a leaky gut and/ or leaky membranes in the brain.3 These symptoms can include seizures for those who are prone to them, nervous “tics”, migraine headaches and skin disruptions such as eczema, hives, flushing, etc.

Signs that one has moved too quickly from Meat Stock to Bone Broth, or that one still has healing to do and would be best to continue with Meat Stock for a while may include nervous system agitation and headaches, or die-off reactions such as rashes or skin eruptions, diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, or constipation.

Why Make Nutrient-Dense Meat Stock and Bone Broth?

Amino acids, gelatin, hydrophilic colloids, HCl, and protein sparers…

 

Amino acids are the building blocks of protein.

Gelatin assists in the proper digestion of proteins and also improves the integrity of collagen. This will be apparent in the improved appearance of the skin as well as in the lessening of digestive tract inflammation.

Gelatin has been known to help heal many digestive and other disorders, including anemia, diabetes, colitis, rheumatoid arthritis and even cancer. Meat Stock is playing a large role in healing disorders that stem from a damaged gut lining, namely food allergies, ADD, AD/HD, Autism Spectrum Disorders, dyslexia, dyspraxia, schizophrenia, and depression. However, it is advised that one start with Meat Stock until much gut healing has taken place, or the free glutamates in Bone Broth may aggravate these disorders.

Hydrophilic colloids attract digestive juices and therefore aid in digestion.

Minerals that are in an electrolytic state are easily absorbed by the body.

HCl is needed to break down proteins in the stomach. Insufficient hydrochloric acid can lead to a whole host of symptoms including acid reflux, skin disorders, anemia, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, vitiligo, asthma, food allergies and more. Most Americans have insufficient HCl.

Being a “protein-sparer”, means you will efficiently utilize the protein you eat and can reduce the amount of protein you need.

Recipes

Basic Meat Stock: Chicken or Turkey
serves about 4

2-3 pounds of pastured chicken or turkey, cut up, or you can use thighs or quarters (do not use breasts)
3-4 carrots, organic preferred, coarsely chopped
one medium onion, organic preferred, peeled and quartered handful of black peppercorns
1-2 tsp Celtic or other good sea salt, no fillers 2-3 sprigs fresh rosemary or thyme (optional)
pure water to cover by 2 inches (this is usually 2 quarts of water or so)

• Place everything in a 5-6 quart Dutch oven.
• Bring to a boil on the stove and skim and discard the scum, then turn heat down to a low simmer and cook, covered, for 1.5-2 hours until the meat is tender.
• Alternative cooking method: Place in the oven at 300 and cook 2-4 hours.
• Alternative cooking method: You may also cook in a crock pot on high for 2 hours and then low for 4-6 hours—more time for a greater amount of meat.

Serve the meat and vegetables with a cup of stock alongside. Use a garlic press to add a small clove of garlic to each cup of stock, along with some good sea salt, whey or probiotic juice.

Note: it is very important to keep the ratios as written in the recipe in order to gain a gelatinous stock—2-3 pounds of meat and about 2 quarts of water. If you have too much water, the stock will not gel.

Basic Meat Stock: Beef or Bison
Serves about 4

2-3 pounds grass fed beef or bison meaty soup bones or short ribs 3-4 carrots, organic preferred, coarsely chopped
one medium onion, organic preferred, peeled and quartered handful of black peppercorns
1-2 tsp Celtic or other good sea salt, no fillers 2-3 sprigs fresh rosemary or thyme (optional)
pure water to cover by 2 inches (this is usually 2 quarts of water or so)

• Place everything in a 5-6 quart Dutch oven.
• Bring to a boil on the stove and skim and discard the scum, then turn heat down to a low simmer and cook, covered, for 4-6 hours until the meat is tender.
• Alternative cooking method: Place in the oven at 300 and cook 4-6 hours.

• Alternative cooking method: You may also cook in a crock pot on high for 2 hours and then low for 8-10 hours—more time for a greater amount of meat.

Serve the meat and vegetables with a cup of stock alongside. Use a garlic press to add a small clove of garlic to each cup of stock, along with some good sea salt, whey or probiotic juice.

Note: it is very important to keep the ratios as written in the recipe in order to gain a gelatinous stock—2-3 pounds of meat and about 2 quarts of water. If you have too much water, the stock will not gel.

Chicken Bone Broth
Makes about 4 quarts

2 chicken carcasses (about 4 pounds of bones) OR 3-4 pounds chicken wings cut up, OR a 3-4 pound stewing hen
4 chicken feet (optional) 4 quarts of pure water
3 celery ribs, coarsely chopped 2 carrots, coarsely chopped
1 onions, coarsely chopped 2 T apple cider vinegar
• If desired, you may brown the stewing hen or wings if using in a 350° F oven for about 30 minutes. (This will concentrate flavor and give the broth a nice, rich color.)
• Place all ingredients in a heavy stock pot and let stand for 30 minutes at room temperature.
• Bring the stock to a boil, skim and discard the scum, and lower to a simmer. Cover and simmer for 6-24 hours.
• Strain. Bring to room temperature and then cool in the refrigerator. Stock should gel when cooled. If it does not, you may wish to add a good quality gelatin to the stock when you use it in recipes.

What if your bone broth does not gel?
The physical sign that you have achieved a nutrient-dense Bone Broth is gelatin; a nutrient- dense Bone Broth gels when it is cooled.

If your bone broth fails to gel when cooled, it is possible that any one or combination of the following was true:
• not enough bones with cartilage (joints, that is, or in the case of poultry, feet)
• too much water to bones
• too much meat to bones (happens with chicken a lot)
• cooked at too high heat
• cooked at too low heat
• added too much water while cooking

Sources and resources:
Cooking Techniques for the Gut and Psychology Syndrome Diet, Part I: Meat Stock and Bone Broth, Monica Corrado, Nourishing Traditions, Sally Fallon and Mary Enig, New Trends Publishing, http://www.biodynamicwellness.com/stock-vs-broth-confused/
Gut and Psychology Syndrome, Natural Treatment for Autism, Dyspraxia, ADD, ADHD, Dyslexia, Depression and Schizophrenia , Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride

1 For more information about the use of gelatin to heal the digestive tract and other disorders, see Natasha Campbell-McBride,MD, Gut and Psychology Syndrome, Natural Treatment for Autism, Dyspraxia, ADD, ADHD, Dyslexia, Depression and Schizophrenia , Kaayla T. Daniel, MS CCN, “Why Broth is Beautiful”, Wise Traditions in Food, Farming and the Healing Arts, Spring 2003, N.R. Gotthoffer, The Use of Gelatin in Nutrition and Medicine, F.M. Pottenger, MD, Hydrophilic Colloid Diet, as well as the Weston A. Price Foundation, www.westonaprice.org.

2 According to a study by Dr. Rennard, Larson Professor of Medicine in the Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Section at UNMC

3 Russell Blaylock, M.D. advises that those with ADHD, autism, multiple sclerosis and other neurological disorders avoid excessive amounts of glutamates. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2004/05/01/glutamine.aspx

 

©2018 Monica Corrado                         Simply Well Being, LLC                          All rights reserved.

Elliot Rhodes

Author: Elliot Rhodes

Elliot Rhodes is the Communications & Marketing Director for OGS. A graduate of Appalachian State University with a Bachelor’s in Social Work, she coordinated High Country CSA in Boone, NC for three years while working in database administration, web development and on various small farms. In Asheville she completed the Tech Talent South Code Bootcamp and worked as web developer & I.T. generalist for Sow True Seed, immersed in programming as well as organic food production & seed saving, before joining OGS. Elliot is passionate about the power of technology to facilitate resiliency and increase access to sustainable solutions.

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